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Two displays from the National Cryptologic Museum stitched together, showing a range of their Enigmas. Photos courtesy of Robert Malgren.

See: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image:Enigmas.jpg

Seven Enigma machines are shown, from left to right (placard text in italics, if known):

Left display: Enigma machines 1923–1939.

  • Commercial ENIGMA. This machine, marked in English "Made in Germany" was intended for commercial export. Such Enigmas were available to anyone who wished to purchase them prior to the Nazi takover of the German government.
  • "T" ENIGMA. A commercial type machine specially wired. Five hundred of these Enigmas were given to the Japanese Navy for joint communications.
  • "G" ENIGMA. A specially constructed machine supplied two some foreign governments friendly to Germany. Two hundred "G" Engimas are known to have been issued to the German High Command (OKW) for an unknown "special purpose".
  •  ??

Right display: Enigma machines 1939–1945

  • DIE LUFTWAFFE (AIR FORCE). Like the Army, the German Air Force relied on the Enigma for communications security. As a result of radio intercept and timely cryptanalysis, which was aided by poor COMSEC on German radio nets, plans such as those for the decisive air attacks known as the "Battle for Britain" were revealed to the British well in advanced of the intended strike. The losses suffered by the German Air Force during this time were never regained.
  • DAS HEER (ARMY)...
  • DIE KRIEGSMARINE (NAVY). With a naval force small in numbers, but technically advanced, the German Naval High Command, in order to offset Allied numerical superiority, adopted a strategy designed to conceal as much as possible the location, intention, and movement of its forces. Forced by its nature to rely on radio communications, the German Navy issued to each vessel from battleship to harbor defense craft an Enigma cipher machine to ensure security. Here as with other services, the dependence upon Enigma for communications security proved to be disastrous.

Between the HEER and KRIEGSMARINE Engimas is an Uhr box.


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current13:59, August 23, 2005Thumbnail for version as of 13:59, August 23, 20051,676 × 746 (301 KB)Matt Crypto (Talk | contribs)Two displays from the National Cryptologic Museum stitched together, showing a range of their Enigmas. Photos courtesy of Robert Malgren. See: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image:Enigmas.jpg Seven Enigma machines are shown, from left to right (p

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